As many of you know, I like basketball and I LOVE being a basketball official. It's gotten a little tougher being a referee lately but it's events like this that make it all worthwhile. It's the Police Week Charity Basketball Tournament.

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After being forced to take a two-year leave of absence because of Covid, the 8th annual Police Week Charity Basketball Tournament is back. The tournament picks a different charity or cause to contribute to every year.

The event will be held on Saturday, May 21st, and the proceeds will go to support Lt. William White. He's been a decorated member of law enforcement for 30 years and was a Tioga County Sheriff Deputy.

I saw "was" because he had to retire from a job that he loves. Recently, he was diagnosed with Stage 4 colon cancer, which spread to his liver, and had to retire to focus on his battle with cancer.

8th Annual Police Week Charity Basketball Tournament In Johnson City

Local Police teams from everywhere will battle it out on the hardwood at the Johnson City Middle School. The games will begin at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 21st. The $10 admission includes entry to all the games, food and drinks, entertainment, and much much more.

All proceeds benefit Lt. White and his family to help with insurance and medical expenses. The men and women in blue do so much to help us and this is one way that we can give back to a man that can use our help.

I'm honored to be asked to be a part of this event again and I hope to see you there.

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