The city of Binghamton is offering a long-term lease extension to a hands-on children's museum which operates at Ross Park.

Mayor Jared Kraham on Tuesday announced the 25-year agreement with the Discovery Center of the Southern Tier.

Kraham said the lease extension will keep the museum in Binghamton "for the next generation."

The mayor noted the Discovery Center provides preschool classrooms and childcare to area residents.

Discovery Center executive director Dr. Brenda Myers speaks as Binghamton Mayor Jared Kraham listens on March 29, 2022. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
Discovery Center executive director Dr. Brenda Myers speaks as Binghamton Mayor Jared Kraham listens on March 29, 2022. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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Dr. Brenda Myers, the organization's executive director, said the Discovery Center staff and volunteers often hear of "those special memories" so many people have of their childhood visits to the museum.

The Discovery Center opened in March 1984 in the gym of the Christopher Columbus School in downtown Binghamton.

The museum moved to a city-owned building next to the Ross Park Zoo on the South Side in 1987.

In addition to dozens of indoor interactive exhibits and activities, the Discovery Center now includes the outdoor Story Garden.

City Council is expected to vote on the proposed lease extension at its April 6 meeting.

The city maintains a $10,000 annual capital fund to cover the expense of various projects, including roof repairs as well as plumbing and electrical work.

Binghamton last year agreed to a 25-year lease extension for the Ross Park Zoo operation.

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Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com.

For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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