Today, December 10th is "National Lager Day" and I'm wondering if it's a coincidence that it happens exactly two weeks before Christmas. In years past (okay, last year), Christmas was a time to get together with family and friends to have fun and possibly enjoy a few drinks.

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So do religion and beer mix? Some songs are believed to have been written to drinking tunes and Martin Luther's song "Thine be the Glory" was originally thought to be one of them. Experts say that isn't true but if you want to see a combination of hymn singing and adult libations then check this out. Save some time and start at the 1:30 mark.

Okay, so religion and drinking don't exactly mix but God and beer have some things in common:

The Greenbelt Festival in London is a Christian music and arts festival, and they have a tent where people go to drink beer while they sing traditional hymns. No, I don't think the people above are at that festival.

The Paulaner monks of Germany brewed their own beer in the 1700s to help them get through the 40-day fast during Lent. It's called "Doppelbock" and is still around today. The beer was heavy and malty and the monks could live on it for the whole fast.

Arthur Guinness was a devout Christian and he created Guinness because he wanted to stop people from getting drunk on hard liquor. He should have done what many Governors have done during this pandemic. Make people buy food while drinking and make them shut down by 10 p.m. Oh yeah and no indoor dining either.

Religion and alcohol don't usually mix but I did find this fascinating. I used to host karaoke shows and many times at the end of the night, I would close with "Amazing Grace." I was amazed at how many people would sing along and thank me for playing it.

Nothing like a Bible song at a bar to end the night.

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