Anyone who has to walk alone after dark in any populated area in New York has probably asked themselves this question: "Should I buy some pepper spray to carry around just in case?"  You never know when we will walk into a situation that we don’t want to be in.

Is Pepper Spray Legal In New York State

Here is another question: Is pepper spray even legal in New York for self-defense purposes? The answer is yes but with some pretty important restrictions. If you're over 18 years old, you can legally carry pepper spray in New York State.

But keep in mind that there are some limitations on the volume and strength of pepper spray you’re allowed to have. According to New York State law, the maximum volume for pepper spray canisters is 0.75 ounces, and the maximum allowable strength for the active ingredient is 0.7% major capsaicinoids.

So, it's important to double-check the label and make sure you're buying a pepper spray that meets these requirements. And here's another thing to keep in mind: pepper sprays and gels can only be sold by licensed firearms dealers and licensed pharmacists in New York State.

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By making sure that approved individuals sell these products, the state hopes to regulate their availability and prevent them from falling into the wrong hands. It’s always better to be safe than sorry but you also need to make sure that you’re following the law.

So make sure to stick to the law and buy it from an authorized retailer because it would be terrible if you bought pepper spray to protect yourself but then got in trouble for the kind you were carrying.

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