I was a bit disappointed that our part of the country missed out on the recent lunar eclipse. OK, I probably wouldn't stay up that late to check it out anyway. Something to do with being lazy. But our next chance is coming soon, not as a lunar eclipse, but rather a partial solar eclipse.

Forbes reports that the first eclipse of the sun since 2017 is about to return on June 10th. This solar eclipse will be visible in parts of the United State and Canada, along with a few other countries. It's a rare solar eclipse that has only occurred twice in the past 150 years according to the Hudson Valley Post.

The Forbes article also mentions that some remote areas will get to observe a ring of fire around the moon as well. It doesn't mention that will be visible anywhere in the United States though.

This solar eclipse will be visible to so few since it's happening just after sunrise in North America and it will be very low on the horizon. So boo-hoo to you Central, Mountain and Pacific time zones.

But the Forbes article explains that for our Northeastern part of the United States, we will only see a portion of the eclipse, stating that New York City will observe 72% of the eclipse and Rochester 78%. So that puts us somewhere in the middle of those two percentages.

If you plan on catching this partial solar eclipse on June 10th, as always, remember to be cautious and wear protective eyewear. As your mother might say, "If not, you could go blind!"

[via Forbes, Hudson Valley Post]

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Today these parks are located throughout the country in 25 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The land encompassing them was either purchased or donated, though much of it had been inhabited by native people for thousands of years before the founding of the United States. These areas are protected and revered as educational resources about the natural world, and as spaces for exploration.

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