Sometimes, smack in the middle of an ordinary day, something so completely unordinary happens and everything about it just stops us right in our tracks.

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You've heard of people pinching themself to see if they're really experiencing what they believe they are, right? The first time I spotted it, I had to pinch myself too. And then I rubbed my eyes. And then, I turned my car around for another look to really make sure I saw what I thought I saw.

The first time I saw the Jurassic Jeep was on June 19, 2016 (thank you Google for date tagging my cloud photos). I vividly remember that it was Father's Day and my husband and son were in the car with me, headed to church in Conklin from our house on the Binghamton's west side, and there it was. Parked on a side street off Riverside Drive and before our very own eyes was a perfectly replicated Jurrasic Park Jeep.

My husband and I looked at each other and then whipped our heads around back to the Jeep to see if we really had seen what we thought we did. Sure enough, it was still sitting there in all of its Jurrasic Park glory.

In the years since I've only seen the Jurrasic Park Jeep in Binghamton one other time...until yesterday. However, the Jeep I saw yesterday wasn't a Jurassic Park Jeep 22 and it didn't have New York plates. I'm super curious whether or not the owner of the Jeep I saw on Kneeland Avenue in Binghamton back in 2016 moved to a different state and came back for a visit with new tags or if the Jurassic Park Motor Pool is expanding in the Southern Tier.

What's the Jurassic Park Motor Pool? It's basically a club for people who really, really like the vehicles from the Jurassic Park movies. A quick search through the website for the club told me that there's someone named Peter in Harpursville who is a member. The next closest member is Alex who lives in Cortland. I know nothing about the Jurassic Park Motor Pool, but I have a hunch that Alex, the member who lives in Cortland, is the owner of the Jurassic Park Jeep 22 that my family stumbled on a couple of years ago because their vehicle is identified on the Jurrasic Park Motor Pool as "VEHICLE #JP22." I mean, it would make sense, right? Then again, I stumbled on this photo showing the Jeep 22 and that it's based in Virginia, so I really have no idea.

Either way, I think that the Jurassic Park Jeep is pretty awesome looking, and seeing another one yesterday (I wish I'd caught the number on the vehicle) added a dose of happiness to my day.

Check Out Binghamton's Awesome Jurassic Park Jeep

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To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.