May is National Mental Health Month.  Perhaps it is a bit ironic that we are in this month of May and for many the worry, uneasiness and stress is at an all-time high.  Worry may involve the physical health of an individual and his or her family.  Uneasiness may come from stress from your job or lack of a job after furloughs and cutbacks.  Stress is all around us.  From financial worries to massive lifestyle changing like being forced to stay home or extra time dealing with family pressures.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers some tips and advice in coping with this very stressful time.  The CDC recommends a number of ways to help combat stress:

Take breaks from watching or reading about COVID-19.  New findings are continually coming out and the information or commentary can become overwhelming.

Take care of your body.  Exercise can help relieve stress. We can get so caught up in this pandemic and worrying continually that we forget or neglect to exercise.  The CDC advises you to take part in activities you enjoy.  This can help you relieve tension and sleep better.

Even if you are in self-quarantine try to connect with others. Totally shutting yourself off from friends, family and co-workers often just makes things worse than they really are.

The CDC advises you to look for facts about COVID-19.  Don't rely on rumors or hearsay.  Search for the truth about the situation from sources that are reliable.

Take care of your mental health. If you have been or are undergoing treatment for mental health issues do your best to continue with that treatment.  Have someone you can call or contact who can support you and help you through tough days or situations.  The CDC advises that if things are building up and you feel like you no longer can handle the stress contact your healthcare provider or call 9-1-1.

 

 

TOWNSQUARE MEDIA BINGHAMTON