Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul has become governor of New York, succeeding Andrew Cuomo who resigned amid a swirl of investigations into a wide array of allegations.

Hochul officially became the 57th governor of the state shortly after midnight Tuesday when she was sworn in at a private ceremony at the Capitol in Albany. She took the oath of office again at a public event later in the morning.

The new governor said she had spoken with President Biden. She said he has pledged to provide his full support to her administration as she takes charge of state government.

Governor Kathy Hochul answered questions from reporters on August 24, 2021. (Image: ny.gov)

In response to a reporter's question, Hochul said she wants the people of New York "to believe in government again."

The new governor also said she will work to change "the culture of Albany."

Hochul is the first woman to serve as New York governor. She also has served as Erie County clerk and as a member of the House of Representatives. She had been lieutenant governor since January 1, 2015.

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Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com or (607) 772-8400 extension 233.

For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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