Nearly a dozen flood-prone Court Street properties are to be demolished as part of a just-announced initiative in Binghamton.

Mayor Jared Kraham said $2.9 million will be spent on the flood mitigation project.

In a news release, Kraham said the city will use money provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency to acquire parcels along a half-mile stretch of Court Street.

The building at 440 Court Street has been occupied by several businesses, including an Arby's restaurant. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
The building at 440 Court Street has been occupied by several businesses, including an Arby's restaurant. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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The properties to be purchased for the project include commercial structures and paved areas. After buildings are torn down, they'll be converted to permanent green space. Trees and grass will be planted to help retain stormwater and to create a buffer to protect nearby properties from future flooding.

The properties to be acquired include: 400 Court Street, 428 Court Street, 440 Court Street, 444 Court Street, 447 Court Street, 448.5 Court Street, 450 Court Street, 470 Court Street, 472 Court Street, 472R Court Street, 498 Court Street and 500 Court Street.

Several nearby businesses in the area - including the McDonald's, Burger King and Taco Bell restaurants - are not part of the acquisition plan.

FLASHBACK: Dirt and mud surrounded a Court Street car wash on Binghamton's East Side on August 16, 2018. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
FLASHBACK: Dirt and mud surrounded a Court Street car wash on Binghamton's East Side on August 16, 2018. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)
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Contact WNBF News reporter Bob Joseph: bob@wnbf.com.

For breaking news and updates on developing stories, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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