The older I get, the more thankful I am for the way that I was raised. Sure, I thought my mom was nuts when I was a kid and our tub faucet needed to be replaced and my mom made all of us kids pile into the bathroom to watch and learn and participate in fixing it, but I realize now she was preparing us for adulthood.

As an adult, I'm fiercely independent and I know a lot of that has to do with how I was raised. My mom wanted to make sure that each of her kids knew how to do things, to fix things, so that we'd never have to rely on someone else to do things for us. From fixing leaky plumbing to changing our own oil, there was virtually nothing we weren't taught how to do.

Years ago I was at the house of a doctor and noticed she didn't have any curtains or blinds installed. I asked why and she told me she had no idea how to install either. So, we went shopping, bought the supplies and within a couple hours, I had blinds and curtains installed in her house. She told me I didn't need to do the work and that she would just hire someone to do it for her, but that seemed silly to me. I was raised to do things myself and save money. I guess for some people, especially those with loads of cash, that isn't the case, but I would imagine that even if I were drowning in money, I'd still do simple things like that myself.

I can understand not doing certain things like changing car oil, but changing a lightbulb? That's simple, right? Nope. Not for some people. As a matter of fact, 20% of people say they have no idea how to change a lightbulb. It's simple, really. Turn off the light, pull up a ladder, twist the lightbulb until it comes out and then twist a new one in the burnt out one's place.

I guess I shouldn't be surprised, but 20% of people don't know how to boil an egg (I know how, but I mess it up every time) and only 37% of people are confident with their tire changing skills.

[via Study Finds]